Thursday, September 4, 2008

Getting Started


The A-Frame design is intended to be sturdy and simple. On paper, it certainly seems to be a simple task... bolt a few pieces of lumber together, in the shape of an "A" and stand them up.

Unfortunately, the building inspector required heavy 2x10 douglas fir lumber (we had planned to use 2x6 pine) and we questioned whether we could even do this without a crane. Given the size of our "A" (24' x 24') we opted for two piece construction figuring a full 24' truss would be too heavy to stand up. Our heavily wooded hilltop site would not allow for even a scissor-lift to be brought-in.

We decided that a practice run was in order, so we pieced together a lower truss in our driveway. The trial truss went wogether easily and we stood-up our "lower A" with no problems... as you can see, we were pretty pleased.

6 comments:

scissor said...

Trapeze artists might be used to working at high altitudes without a net. After all, flirting with danger far above the ground is part of the reason they're so exciting to watch. However, working without a "safety net" on a scissor Lift should not be met with the same degree of flair for the dramatic.

aframehistory said...

I'd love to see a post on the final stages and result (even interior shots, conclusions etc.).

Kurt Kline said...

Did you ever post any inside shots of this place. I've been trying to design something very similar to this and was curious with your dimensions how much space there really was inside. Thanks

John Maxwell said...

Can we see the floor plan layouts?

Fairburn Renovations said...

good morning. May I ask how much it all ended up costing in the end? We're going to be doing this exact project in a couple of years and want to try to get the budget right :)

Jessica

tonegalli said...

Hey - where are you in "far Northern Wisconsin"? Just curious. We have a cabin on the Flambeau river in Winter Wisconsin, not far from Big Bear and Tony